Course Offerings

NEBC/Grace Evangelical Course Offerings

A note on area, number, and title designations of courses: 

All of our courses are listed under the five major emphases of our curriculum: Foundational Courses, Biblical Studies, Christian Thought, Spiritual Formation, and Ministry Arts. All courses are open to undergraduate and graduate students, with more stringent course assignments and requirements placed upon those students doing graduate level work. Each individual course listed in this catalog is designated by two letters, number/number, and a descriptive title.

 

The beginning two letters of each listing describe the course’s more particular area of study.  For example, Biblical Studies includes courses in Biblical Languages (Ln) and the content of the Bible (Bi), while the Christian Thought area includes courses in Church History (CH), Theology (Th), and Philosophy (Ph). The two numbers indicate the level of the course as an undergraduate/graduate offering. For undergraduates, “100” level courses are introductory, the first level of courses available in a study area; “200” courses are intermediate; and “300” and “400” courses are advanced.

 

At the graduate level, “500” is introductory; “600” is intermediate; and “700” is advanced level. Students are advised that each of these numbers correspond to the difficulty and prerequisites needed for a class. First year students—whether undergraduate or graduate—are advised to begin with mostly introductory level classes, which help establish the foundations for the knowledge and skill they will soon gain in intermediate and more advanced level courses.

 

Also note that “1” or a “2” following the course title indicates that the course is the first or second semester of a two semester course sequence, and the “1” course is normally a prerequisite for the “2” course. An example would be that Introduction to Biblical Greek 1 is the first semester of first-year Greek, and Introduction to Biblical Greek 2 is the second semester: the first semester course must be taken before one will be able to take the second.

 

Foundational Courses

These courses give students a solid grounding for whatever educational program they pursue at NEBC/ Grace, by providing them with academic tools, and the intellectual and spiritual orientation needed to make the most of their future classes.

 

En 100/500 Academic Success

This course equips students with the tools to succeed throughout their studies at New England Bible College/Grace Evangelical. It includes a look at logic, and will teach how to think and write critically. You will learn how to do research, how to write papers using the proper format, how to manage time, how to approach all the areas of study at NEBC/GES, and how to deal with the pressures of school and life. It is mandatory for all entering under-graduate students and is recommended for MA students returning to study after some time away.

 

SF 100/500 Spiritual Formation and Transformation

Although Scripture tells us that everyone should be transformed by the renewing of their minds and conformed to the image of Christ, we all know that there is not nearly as much of this transformation going on as there could and should be. One reason is that many people have an insufficient grasp of what this process is. Another reason is that people lack specific knowledge about how one goes about being transformed. We will focus on both of these important areas.

 

Th 100/500 Hermeneutics: Worldview, Theology and the Bible

Christians are called to be “in the world, but not of the world.” Yet many current expressions and understandings of the faith, including reading the Bible, often rest upon assumptions and attitudes conditioned by the culture around us—a culture not necessarily friendly to Christianity. This class addresses how we can be more discerning and mature in our understanding of the faith, our interpretation of Scripture, and our proclamation of the gospel to a world that desperately needs it.

 

Biblical Studies

The area of Biblical Studies includes courses in the biblical languages, survey courses on the Old Testament, New Testament, more focused courses on individual parts of the Bible as well as courses offering thematic considerations of topics running through Scripture.

 

Languages

Ln 100/500 Greek/Hebrew for Bible Study

A course introducing the basics of alphabet, vocabulary, grammar, and structure of Greek and Hebrew so that students may having a working knowledge to better use the diversity of linguistic tools and resources available for Bible study, whether as lay people or clergy. 

 

Ln 101/501 Introduction to Biblical Greek 1

Introduction to the New Testament’s language. Greek is a doorway to deeper understanding of all the New Testament writings. This course takes up the Greek alphabet and the basics of grammar and vocabulary, leading to a basic competence in translation.

 

Ln 102/502 Introduction to Biblical Greek 2

(Prerequisite: Ln 101) Continues the building process to an initial competence in the original Greek language of the Bible.

 

Ln 103/503 Living Koine Greek 1

Koine Greek was the international language of business, politics and culture for centuries in the Greco-Roman empire following the conquest of Alexander the Great. The Septuagint (Old Testament) and New Testament are recorded in this nuanced, specific language. We will learn Koine as a living language, using immersion techniques to explore vocabulary and grammar. Observation, action, and direct association will lead to confidence in reading the text in its original language.

 

Ln 104/504 Living Koine Greek 2

(Pre-requisite: Living Koine Greek 1) We will continue to learn Koine as a living language, using immersion techniques to explore vocabulary and grammar. Observation, action, and direct association will lead to confidence in reading the text in its original language.

 

Ln 111/511 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 1

The Old Testament’s first language was Hebrew. This course takes up the Hebrew alphabet and the basics of grammar and vocabulary, leading to a basic competence in translation.

 

Ln 112/512 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 2

(Prerequisite: Ln 111) This course continues the study of the Old Testament’s Hebrew language, leading to more effective Old Testament exegesis and interpretation.

 

Ln 201/601 Greek Exegesis

(Prerequisite: Ln 101 & 102 or 103 & 104) This course offers students the opportunity to put their new knowledge of Greek into use reading, studying and interpreting select passages of the New Testament in its original language.

 

Ln 202/602 Hebrew Exegesis

(Prerequisite: Ln 111 & 112) This course offers students the opportunity to put their new knowledge of biblical Hebrew into use reading, studying and interpreting select passages of the Old Testament in its original language.

 

Old Testament

Bi 101/501 Old Testament Survey

This course introduces students to the content of English translations of the Old Testament, helping them learn the people, events, covenants, literary genres and narratives in its diverse collection of books given to God’s people. It affords an overview of the Holy Scripture read by Jesus, in which His own advent and saving work is foreshadowed.

Bi 103/503 Old Testament Themes & Interpretation

This course broadens and deepens the knowledge gained in the OT Survey, while exploring more fully the theological implications and practical applications of that knowledge. How the OT is foundational to Christian faith and our understanding of the New Testament will be examined as well, including prophecies of the coming Messiah.

 

Bi 201/601 Old Testament Theology

The writings of the Old Testament have a variety of human authors and editors spread across centuries in diverse contexts. Yet each in their own way bear inspired and common witness to the covenantal promises, actions, and requirements of God. This course will examine the ways in which Israel’s scribes and prophets all attest to God’s continuing faithfulness and greater purposes.

 

Bi 301/601 The Pentateuch

Introduces the student to the foundational documents of Judaism and Christianity, the Torah/Pentateuch, showing how the later Biblical books build on the foundation of the Mosaic Covenant. The course focuses on the main themes developed in these books, as well as some of the controversies surrounding authorship and interpretation.

 

Bi 311/611 Old Testament Prophets & Prophecy

This course offers a more detailed study of selected Old Testament prophets and their particular situations. It will examine how their preaching and proclamations are grounded in God’s Torah and his larger covenantal purposes—past, present, and future.

 

Bi 321/621 The Psalms & Wisdom Literature

This course offers a more detailed study of that OT section collectively called “The Writings,” that is, ancient Israel’s hymnbook (The Psalms) as well as works such as Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Job and the Song of Solomon. It will also consider how these writings fit into the larger context of the biblical canon and God’s covenantal purposes.

 

New Testament

Bi 102/502 New Testament Survey

This course introduces students to the content of English translations of the New Testament, helping them learn the literary genres of parable, gospel, epistle, and apocalyptic, the basics Jesus’ life and teachings, and the history of the early church, and the writings of the apostles.

 

Bi 104/504 New Testament Themes & Interpretation

This course broadens and deepens the knowledge gained in the NT Survey, while exploring more fully the theological implications and practical applications of that knowledge.

 

Bi 202/602 New Testament Theology

The New Testament has a variety of human authors motivated by different immediate concerns writing to diverse audiences. Yet they all bear inspired witness to the one work of God the Father in Jesus Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit. This course will examine both the distinctive presentations of the apostolic authors and their common witness to the one Gospel.

 

Bi 314/614 Readings in the Gospels and Acts

This course surveys the three synoptic gospels, plus Luke’s Acts of the Apostles, as well as the gospel of John, with the aim of understanding each writer’s particular theological teachings and concerns, while also drawing attention to their complementary witness to the one Gospel.

 

Bi 324/624 Readings in the Epistles

This course surveys the letters of Paul, James, Peter and John, with the aim of understanding each author’s particular theological concerns and teachings, while also drawing attention to their complementary witness to the one Gospel.

 

Biblical Context and Themes

Bi 210/610 Canon and Creed

For Jesus and the first disciples, the “Scriptures” were just the “Old” Testament. Yet under the guidance of the Holy Spirit and the “rule of faith,” the Church came to recognize the apostolic writings as equally authoritative. So what is the relation between the OT and NT? How is the Old Testament the foundation for the New? How is the New the fulfillment of the Old? And how did Old and New together become the Christian Bible?

 

Bi 232/632 Eschatology in the Christian Canon

Eschatology is the study of the Church’s enduring faith in God’s promise to overcome the ills and sin of this world through its final judgment, restoration and glorification. What is involved? What is now? What is future? This course will consider the eschatological texts of both the Old and New Testaments, as well as the Church’s historic and current teachings.

 

Bi 360/760 Biblical Settings

Understanding the world of the Bible can help explain the text more fully. This course will use a multidisciplinary approach to learn about Biblical archaeology and geography as well as some cultural backgrounds to bring the text to life. It will put places “on the map” and help students understand why towns, roads, and attack routes arose where they did. It will examine how archaeology is done and explore what it can and cannot teach us about the Biblical story.

 

Bi 365/765 Holy Land Trip Preparation and Trip

Open to all. Particularly taught for those traveling with Grace Evangelical on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, this course brings students into contact with 1) Holy Land history and archaeology, 2) Holy Land topography and geography, 3) the art of biblical story telling, and 4) what to bring/pack/wear, etc.: a practical primer. Five Saturday sessions. This course is completed while on site in Israel and when the students return.

 

Bi 470/770 Topics in Biblical Studies
A focused consideration of a Scriptural topic, to be determined by the instructor. “Topics” courses typically vary from semester to semester, dealing with matters such as individual books of the Bible, sections and/or genres of biblical writing, or specific themes. The announcement and description of a particular topic will be provided to students when course registration begins. Professor’s permission required prior to enrollment. Course may be taken more than once if topic varies.

 

Bi 480/780 Directed Study in Biblical Studies

Directed studies allow the student(s) taking them to focus on a particular topic under the direct supervision of a professor in Biblical Studies. A directed study plan (including meeting times and topics covered, reading assignments, and paper/exam requirements and deadlines) must be completed with the signatures of the student(s) and the professor, and approved by the Academic Dean. Directed Study courses may be taken more than once given different topics.

 

Bi 490/790 Thesis

This “course” is a substantial piece of scholarly research and writing on a topic within the field of biblical studies. That topic must be approved by the Academic Dean, who will assign a thesis advisor from the Faculty. The thesis may serve as the capstone requirement in several of our degree programs.

 

Christian Thought

The area of “Christian Thought” considers the meaning of the Christian faith both now and historically, in order to remain faithful to Scripture and be effective in witness. It therefore includes courses in the history of the Church over the centuries, as well as the teachings (doctrines), theology and ethical norms of the Christian faith. It also considers other faiths and ideologies from a Christian perspective, so it includes courses in world religions, philosophy, and Christian apologetics.

 

History

Hi 101/501 Church History Survey

This course will examine the explosive growth of the early Church, key turning points and developments in the Christian community over the centuries, and current trends and movements in the contemporary Church.

 

Hi 102/502 Church History in World Context

This course presupposes the overview of Church History Survey and examines more deeply key landmarks, persons, and movements in the Church’s ongoing pilgrimage. The course will pay particular attention to how the Church shaped, and was shaped by, its engagement with the cultures around it and the role it has played in the development of world history.

 

Hi 211/611: World Religions

Given modern communications, travel, and immigration patterns, Christians have a responsibility to have a basic understanding of the other major religions of the world. This courses endeavors to provide that knowledge, as well as to promote both critical thinking and appropriately respectful engagement.

 

Hi 304/604 American Church History

This course surveys the development and growth of American religious experience. Through reading of both original and secondary sources, this course will investigate the rise of denominations, changes in American religion caused by immigration, and the intellectual and cultural changes leading to our modern religious landscape.

 

Hi 320/620 Early Church History

This course will explore the thought and times of the Early Church Fathers and Apologists through an in-depth investigation of early heresies that challenged the Church to develop appropriate articulations of orthodoxy. This course will explore the Early Church through the year 600.

 

Hi 330/630 Reformation Theologies

This course explores the major theological and practical upheavals in Christianity from the 15th through the 17th centuries. This period was one of radical change for the Catholic tradition and marks the birth of the Lutheran, Reformed, and Anabaptist traditions. The course will explore the major figures and developments of the Reformation Era through primary and secondary readings, lecture and discussion.

 

Hi 470/770 Topics in Church History
A focused consideration of a topic in Church History, to be determined by the instructor. “Topics” courses typically vary from semester to semester, dealing with matters such as individual theologians, eras, traditions, movements or contemporary issues. The announcement and description of a particular topic will be provided to students when course registration begins. Professor’s permission required prior to enrollment. Course may be taken more than once if topic varies.

 

Hi 480/780 Directed Study in Church History

Directed studies allow the student(s) taking them to focus on a particular topic under the direct supervision of a professor in Church History. A directed study plan (including meeting times and topics covered, reading assignments, and paper/exam requirements and deadlines) must be completed with the signatures of the student(s) and the professor, and approved by the Academic Dean. Directed Study courses may be taken more than once given different topics.

 

Hi 490/790 Thesis

This “course” is a substantial piece of scholarly research and writing on a topic within the field of Church History. That topic must be approved by the Academic Dean, who will assign a thesis advisor from the Faculty. The thesis may serve as the capstone requirement in several of our degree programs.

 

Theology, Philosophy, and Doctrine

Th 101/501 Introduction to Christian Theology

This single semester class presents the basics of Christian theology. It introduces students to essential beliefs about the triune God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), as well as topics such as creation, the fall and sin, the covenant of salvation, the church, sanctification, and the last things. This course stands on its own, but also serves as a primer to Christian Doctrine 1 & 2.

 

Ph 102/502 Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics

Beginning with the ancient Greeks and moving to modern times, this course will survey the major philosophical schools and their assumptions and teachings. The course will help students better understand how Christianity has both adapted and used various philosophical systems, while also resisting others.

 

Th 201/601 Christian Doctrine 1

The word “doctrine” derives from the Latin word for “teaching” or “instruction,” which means that Christian doctrine is simply the orthodox teachings about the various elements of our faith. This first part of a two semester course will address the biblical grounding of Christian belief as such, the Trinity, creation and providence, human nature, sin, and the covenant of grace.

 

Th 202/602 Christian Doctrine 2

This second semester will consider the person of Christ and his work of salvation, the Holy Spirit, the doctrine of the Church, Christian life, Christianity’s relation to other religions, and the Last Things. (Prerequisite: Th 301/601 or permission)

 

Ph 203/603 Introduction to Apologetics

“Apologetics” has nothing to do with saying you’re sorry! Rather, it is the technical term for making a reasoned argument in defense of a position or to encourage that position’s acceptance. Perhaps the most famous Christian example is Paul’s speech to the Athenians on the Areopagus (Acts 17). Apologetics draws its evidence from everyday experience and academic disciplines such as philosophy, history, cosmology, and other sciences. Students will learn what they need to be able defenders of Christian faith as well as having their own faith strengthened.

 

Th 301/701 Living Trinitarian Faith

Intended as a follow-up course to Th 201/601 and Th 202/602, this course considers more thoroughly how Trinitarian faith pervades the Christian understanding God’s being and revelation, the person and saving work of Christ, and the place and role of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Christian community.

 

Th 470/770 Topics in Theology
A focused consideration of a topic in theology or doctrine, to be determined by the instructor. “Topics” courses typically vary from semester to semester, addressing thematic subjects or considering the work of specific theologians, thinkers, or traditions. The announcement and description of a particular topic will be provided to students when course registration begins. Instructor’s permission required prior to enrollment. Course may be taken more than once if topic varies.

 

Th 480/780 Directed Studies in Theology

Directed studies allow the student(s) taking them to focus on a particular topic under the direct supervision of a professor in Theology. A directed study plan (including meeting times and topics covered, reading assignments, and paper/exam requirements and deadlines) must be completed with the signatures of the student(s) and the professor, and approved by the Academic Dean. Directed Study courses may be taken more than once given different topics.

 

Th 490/790 Thesis

This “course” is a substantial piece of scholarly research and writing on a topic within the field of biblical studies. That topic must be approved by the Academic Dean, who will assign a thesis advisor from the Faculty. The thesis may serve as the capstone requirement in several of our degree programs.

 

Ministry Arts

The area of “Ministry Arts” is a broad one, and includes a diverse array of courses aimed at developing the practical knowledge and skills needed for faithful and effective pastoral ministry, such as worship leadership, effective teaching, communication, counseling, and the like.

 

Ed 101/501 Introduction to Christian Education

This course examines human and spiritual development theories that inform explanations of how people learn. Developmental stages will be explored along with learning styles. Theories and research are included with an emphasis on practical applications. Students will build a philosophy of education and gain practical lesson planning and teaching experience.

 

Mi 110/510 Theology, History, and Practice of Worship

This course explores the elements of Christian worship, from its scriptural roots and the practices of the early Church. We will consider practices in different Christian traditions with an eye to why those differences exist and what they mean. What is personal worship? What is corporate worship? Efforts will be made to have leaders from various denominational backgrounds available to describe their worship practices and traditions.

 

Co 120/520 Introduction to Preaching and Public Speaking

This course provides the opportunity for the student to learn how to effectively communicate publicly. It will help the student learn how to prepare lessons and speeches, and present their material clearly and appealingly, providing them opportunities to practice with constructive comments from their peers, instructor and professionals (teachers, professors and pastors).

 

Mi 200/600 Pastoral Ministry

This course is designed to look at the “nuts and bolts” of pastoral ministry. The student will learn how to officiate and create various kinds of services (funerals, weddings, sacraments of Baptism and the Lord’s Supper, commissionings, dedications, confirmations, etc.) by using a pastor’s manual/service book of their choice. There will also be discussion of the basics of pastoral visitations, care and leadership. Also included will be the ongoing sharing of the student’s personal devotional walk, as well as some case-study investigations.

 

Mi 250/650 Evangelism and Missions

Evangelism is an act of divine-human cooperation: the Church sharing good news of God’s salvation in Christ by His Spirit’s enabling power. Mission presupposes evangelism, but can add to it an aspect of concrete service, such as disaster relief, medical care, or educational efforts.  This foundational course in evangelism and missions deals with the biblical basis and theological rationale for such work, especially in the light of negative trends such as post-modernity, “pluralism” and “tolerance” that downplay Christian witness. Students will also be introduced to a variety of Christian organizations doing such work.

 

Co 262/562 Computers in Ministry

Focusing on the benefits computers offer to ministry, this user-friendly course offers teaching and hands-on application. It introduces Bible study software, computer animated slide presentations e.g. Power Point, website construction, desktop publishing, and other skills.

 

Mi 301/601 Basic Biblical Counseling

This course will examine counseling from a Biblical perspective. God has placed in the Bible solutions for human problems and needs, and provides the keys for successful and contented living. Believers taking this course will learn how to become effective Biblical counselors for basic spiritual and emotional needs.

 

Mi 302/602 Intermediate Christian Counseling

This course will begin where Basic Biblical Counseling ended. Its main purpose will be to observe, understand and apply the Bible’s solutions to human problems and needs. Students taking this course will become better equipped to help others in Christian counseling situations.

 

Mi 360/660 Business Administration for Ministry

This course explores fundamental management principles to assist current or future ministry leaders. Students will explore basic management and leadership principles, learn to manage risk and investigate basic financial management including understanding the time-value of money, evaluating financial statements, managing budgets and raising funds. While the course emphasis is on the organization, application and resources will be provided for personal financial management. A financial calculator and/or Microsoft Excel is recommended.

 

Mi 451/751 Hospital Chaplaincy

This course is offered in conjunction with the Chaplain Intern Program (CIP) at Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor. It is an intensive practical ministry introduction that students may undertake either from September through February, or late February through July. It involves many hours each week at Eastern Maine Medical Center. This course can be taken for nine credit hours at NEBC/Grace Evangelical.

 

Mi 460/760 Ministry Assessment and Management

This course—intended primarily for students in their final year—offers the opportunity to further integrate and strengthen various pastoral skills, while also prompting students to greater clarity regarding pastoral responsibilities, limitations, ethics, and leadership. It also offers practical advice on time management, good physical health practices, personality and skills assessment, and spiritual disciplines. Some class sessions may be led by experienced pastors sharing their expertise and responding to student questions.

 

Mi 470/770 Topics in Ministry
A focused consideration of a topic in ministry or the pastoral arts, to be determined by the instructor. “Topics” courses typically vary from semester to semester, addressing thematic subjects, specific pastoral issues, or the development of particular skills. The announcement and description of a particular topic will be provided to students when course registration begins. Instructor’s permission required prior to enrollment. Course may be taken more than once if topic varies.

 

Mi 480/780 Directed Study in Ministry

Directed studies allow the student(s) taking them to focus on a particular topic under the direct supervision of a professor in Ministry. A directed study plan (including meeting times and topics covered, reading assignments, and paper/exam requirements and deadlines) must be completed with the signatures of the student(s) and the professor, and approved by the Academic Dean. Directed Study courses may be taken more than once given different topics.

 

Mi 490/790 Ministry Project

This “course” is a substantial project undertaken to serve a particular and well-defined pastoral need or purpose. It will include initial research and preparation, the actual implementation of the project, and a final report analyzing its relative success or shortcomings. The project must have prior approval by the Academic Dean, who will assign a project advisor (who may be a faculty member or an overseeing pastor). The ministry project may serve as the capstone requirement in several of our degree programs.

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